OnePlus 7 Pro gets Android Q beta; kernel source code is now live

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OnePlus receives active support from third-party developers and users who prefer to customize the software on their devices. Not only that, the company actively relies on feedback from its consumers to make its custom version of Android – OxygenOS – more appealing and useful. The company recently announced its first true flagship competitor, the OnePlus 7 Pro (review), with striking looks, an idyllic Quad HD+ display, and the muscle power for highly enjoyable gaming performance. The version of OxygenOS based on Android 9.0 Pie brings some new features like the Zen Mode, Screen Recorder, etc. and the company is already working with Google to bring Android Q to the OnePlus 7 Pro.

OnePlus 7 XDA ForumsOnePlus 7 Pro XDA Forums

At the Google I/O conference earlier this month, Google announced the first Android Q developer preview for non-Google devices. With this announcement, OnePlus rolled out OxygenOS based on the Android Q beta for the OnePlus 6 and the OnePlus 6T. Further, since this was before the release of the OnePlus 7 series, the company promised to bring the latest preview of Android to the duo post-launch. Now, adhering to its promise, the company will now allow OnePlus 7/7 Pro users to try the latest beta of Android.

The latest build of Android Q beta is currently unfinished and is mostly suitable for Android developers willing to test their apps for Android Q. Besides an unstable experience, the build has a number of issues and is not recommended if you plan to use the smartphone as a daily driver. On the Android Q beta for the OnePlus 7 series:

  • ambient Display is not working
  • you cannot send SMS when VoLTE is on
  • navigation gesture is not working
  • recovery mode doesn’t work
  • some apps may not function as expected
  • there’s an issue with MTP that doesn’t allow you to copy rollback file from PC to Phone

Apart from this development, the company has also released the kernel source code for the OnePlus 7/7 Pro (GitHub). As Android users become more aware of the multitude of modding possibilities on their Android devices, companies have picked up pace in release kernel sources. Many of these manufacturers use this as a USP for the brand and boast about supporting third-party development – even though they are obligated to do so under GNU General Public License. The availability of kernel sources, nonetheless, is exciting for users since it allows device-specific development of custom ROMs, custom kernels, and a host of other third-party modification resources.


Source: OnePlus

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